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Feb 14, 2019

Bob Harlow, author of Taking Out the Guesswork: A Guide to Using Research to Build Arts Audiences, delivered a keynote address at the 2016 conference of Arts Reach, an association of arts professionals. He showed how three arts organizations—the Pacific Northwest Ballet in Seattle, the Clay Studio in Philadelphia and the San Francisco Girls Chorus—used audience research to attract and retain audiences that had previously eluded them.


Dec 20, 2018

How are audiences affected by live choral music concerts? What can we conclude about the experiences they have? How do their experiences differ? Can we identify drivers of impact?  In 2013, Chorus America initiated discussions with WolfBrown to design a study to answer these questions and build a foundational understanding of the impact of attendance at choral concerts. A total of 23 choruses across North America participated in the study, including a cross section of youth and adult ensembles. Over the 2014-15 and 2015-16 seasons, 14,236 audience members at 136 different concert programs completed surveys about their experience. The study, published on June 2016, builds on a substantial body of past research conducted by WolfBrown and other researchers investigating the intrinsic impact of live arts programs.

Tags: Music Research

Sep 05, 2018

Music organizations and ensembles from 17 European countries participated in a two-year project (New Music : New Audiences, 2012-2014) on audience engagement with the aim of creating and trying out concert formats in tune with a contemporary audience. The project was supported by the Cultural Programme of EU and explored several aspects of the way that new music can meet an audience.

Here you will find the final report with all the findings and conclusion. A good resource for professionals, students and researchers of the classical and contemporary music scene looking for ideas to better engage their audinces.


The XIX century building that now hosts Maison des Metallos (MdM)  was a former music instruments factory, and then became headquarters of the Union Fraternelle des Métallos, a situation that lasted for 60 years and that left an important legacy in terms of place identity. Since the Union left in 1997, the building was run by a committee of inhabitants of the neighbourhood, who occupied it because they felt it was part of local identity. They were concerned about the forthcoming gentrification, which was starting at that time in the former working class neighbourhood. This sense of belonging of the local community had an important role in pushing the municipality of Paris to buy the venue, but also created at first some tension with the occupants as the city decided to convert it in a cultural venue run by an appointed director, that opened in 2007. So the first audience “issue” that MdM had to face, was to find the way to involve and resolve this tension. The relationship with the associations and former occupants took time to be reconstructed, but it’s today an important part of the identity of MdM and of its relation with the neighbourhood.