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May 30, 2018

seminario deusto

On May 25 2018, it was held the Research Seminar ‘Connecting with the public of our museums’ in Madrid, organized in the framework of the research projects CONNECT and PUBLICUM, which are currently being carried out by the Institute of Leisure Studies at the University of Deusto. The Seminar was possible thanks to the support of the Chair in Leisure and Knowledge, funded by Banco Santander. The event raised interest among representatives of cultural institutions such as the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport, ICOM Spain, National Prado Museum, Spanish Cultural Action or CaixaForum Madrid.

The seminar was structured in two parts: first, a panel that addressed the topic of audience development and museums from an academic point of view; second, a panel that addressed that topic from a practical point of view.

During the first part and based on the final report of the Engage Audiences Project Macarena Cuenca (University of Deusto),  reviewed the subject according to eight strategic areas of intervention in Audience Developmentapplied to the field of museums: (1) programming; (2) participation and co-creation; (3) the digital; (4) the use of data; (5) spaces; (6) collaborations and alliances; (7) organizational change; (8) capacity development. After this, Amaia Makua (University of Deusto) continued with a reflection on a new professional profile, understood as the strategic capacity of the organization to which cultural organizations must respond in order to face the challenge of reorienting themselves towards the public. Based on the research carried out in the ADESTE and CONNECT projects, Amaia explained the training needs that were identified and how the University of Deusto plans to respond to these needs through a double postgraduate education (Expert in Cultural Audiences and Audiences Strategies Expert). The pilot program of these titles will be launched in the academic year 2018-2019.

seminario deusto 2

The second part of the Seminar included the presentations of Virginia Garde, Head of the Dissemination and Development Area of the General Subdirectorate of State Museums, and Marcos García, Artistic Director of Medialab Prado. Virginia presented the work carried out by the Permanent Laboratory of Public of Museums, focused on understanding the visitors of the state museums and the actions that have been launched in order to promote this orientation in the museums that are members of the Laboratory. The initiative Museums + social is an example of this. Finally, Marcos addressed the case of Medialab Prado, an initiative of the City of Madrid, conceived as a citizen laboratory for production, research, and dissemination of cultural projects that explores the different ways of experimentation and collaborative learning that arises from digital networks. Medialab is a good example of an organization oriented to its audiences through their work with their local communities and their involvement in participatory projects. Both the closing discussion between speakers and participants, and the coffee break were highly rewarding due to the debate and the interest generated, as well as the networking that took place during the seminar.


May 18, 2018

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La Cátedra de Ocio y Conocimiento del Instituto de Estudios de Ocio de la Universidad de Deusto tiene el placer de invitarle al Seminario Permanente de Investigación Interdisciplinar(SEPII) titulado “Los museos en el marco del desarrollo de audiencias”.

Este Seminario, desarrollado en colaboración con los proyectos de investigación CONNECT. Connecting audiences (575807-EPP-1-2016-1-ES-EPPKA2-KA) y PUBLICUM. Públicos en transformación. Nuevas formas de la experiencia del espectador y sus interacciones con la gestión museística (HAR2017-86103-P), tendrá lugar el próximo 25 de mayo, de 10:00 a 13:30 hs., en la Sala 1+2 de la Sede de la Deusto Business School de la Universidad de Deusto en Madrid (C/ Castelló, 76).

Aforo limitado. Por favor, confirme su asistencia, respondiendo a este formulario.

Programa

10:00 Bienvenida y apertura.

10:15 Mesa 1. Estado del arte. El desarrollo de audiencias en museos.

Dña. Macarena Cuenca. Universidad de Deusto.

Dña. Amaia Makua. Universidad de Deusto.

11:45 Pausa Café.

12:15 Mesa 2. Reflexiones y propuestas desde la praxis.

Dña. Virginia Garde. Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. 

D. Marcos García. Medialab Prado.

13:20 Clausura.

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One of the main challenges in implementing CONNECT on European level is merging all the specific differences coming from each national educational systems. As an international team we wanted to find out what is the place of audience development within overall educational offer across different countries in Europe. To do so, we conducted a survey on programmes for the development of entrepreneurial and AD-related skills in Denmark, Spain, Italy, Poland and the UK.

The survey aimed to gather knowledge regarding each individual national context and draw a picture of the educational offer related to the mentioned areas in terms of similarities and differences. This is to give a better understanding of the settings the CONNECT project is to be implemented in and empower its effectiveness in developing an unique educational programme in the future. The findings cover the overall educational practises related to audience development and entrepreneurship in the 5 respective countries involved. These are namely: Denmark (with a broader perspective on the Nordic region), Spain, Italy, Poland and the UK.

Similarities and differences in the analysed curricula

All of the examined countries function within the Bologna system. This helps to put the programmes all together and evaluate them within an universal framework. However, one might consider the fact that practices of attending and perceiving university courses by attendees differs from one country to another. Within the studied educational systems with a reference to the discussed issue there is a vast range of diverse programmes: economy and business studies (e.g. in Italy and the UK), cultural management (focused on different cultural aspects, from national heritage to the arts), cultural studies (strongly present in Poland), museology (Spain, Italy), design (the Nordic region), cultural policy (Sweden), education and tourism (Spain, Italy) and finally social studies and communication.

Definitely, the presence of the research areas related to AD and entrepreneurship in the academic curricula in the 5 selected countries appears to be clearly unbalanced on a few levels. First differentiation relates to the area of studies. The analysis brings a reflection on the origins of the programmes. One might notice that AD and entrepreneurial matters fit quite well in many types of humanistic programmes as well and economy and business-related ones. The diversification in this regard depending on the country is highly visible. For instance, educational offer in the UK has a very strong tradition and seems to follow a systemic thinking about cultural management and cultural policy; Nordic countries stress innovation and re-design/re-conceptualize the programmes frequently; Italy and Spain balance between 2 kind of approaches: one focused on communication, management and marketing, second on education (attached mostly to the matter of cultural heritage); whereas academic offer in Poland evolves from theoretical cultural studies, which commonly take into account and react to the actual market needs. In the last mentioned country, courses entrepreneurially oriented are being slowly introduced to the programmes and usually shape an unique specialization within a broader study programme.

Because of the above stated, the offer in a large extent differs from one another in terms of the main emphasis. For example. In the UK a lot of programmes can be managerial, in Poland much more focused on social impact, in Scandinavia there is a clear focus on innovation and communication. In Italy and Spain the core tendency appears to be slightly more fragmented.

It is also interesting to look at the programmes from the perspective of the market demand. An interesting case is Spain, where some visible decrease of AD and entrepreneurial oriented courses was detected. This means that some previous editions had been delivered but for certain reasons no edition was offered this year or in the last two years and the websites were not updated any longer. It seems that some years ago there was a boom in Spain and many cultural management related courses were created. From a market perspective, and apart from the crisis as the main cause of that decrease, it makes sense that the space for competitors is limited and only those who make the difference survive. On the other hand, in Poland recently there is a visible need for cultural management related education and as the consequence a significant number of new courses have been introduced into the academic curricula at many local universities.

A common conclusion for the examined countries is that AD and CE related education is strongly developed by non-university bodies. Even in countries like the UK, where the concept of audience development is commonly introduced in the study programmes, there’s a vast range of educational projects in this field offered by agencies, foundations, private experts, etc. These, however, are normally focused on professionals as a target group. It indicates and may lead to an assumption that the overall academic educational offer in Europe does not fully encourage professionals to follow the relevant courses. In fact, there is a relatively small number of study programmes fully designed only for practitioners.

You can find our more by downloading the RESEARCH REPORT.

 

SIMILARITIES

1.

All of the examined countries function within the Bologna system. This helps to put the programmes all together and evaluate them within an universal framework.

2.

The overall academic educational offer in Europe does not fully encourage professionals to follow the relevant courses. In fact, there is a relatively small number of study programmes fully designed only for practitioners.

3.

In all of the examined countries AD and CE related education is strongly developed by non-university bodies.

 

COUNTRY SPECIFIC DIFFERENCES

 

Denmark and other Nordic countries stress innovation and re-design/re-conceptualize the programmes frequently.

Distinguished focus of the programmes characteristic for the country:
innovation and communication

 

Italy and Spain balance between 2 kind of approaches: one focused on communication, management and marketing, second on education (attached mostly to the matter of cultural heritage).

Distinguished focus of the programmes characteristic for the country:
the core tendency appears to be fragmented

 

Academic offer in Poland evolves from theoretical cultural studies, which commonly take into account and react to the actual market needs. In this particular country courses entrepreneurially oriented are being slowly introduced to the programmes and usually shape an unique specialization within a broader study programme.

Distinguished focus of the programmes characteristic for the country:
social impact

 

Educational offer in the UK has a very strong tradition and seems to follow a systemic thinking about cultural management and cultural policy.

Distinguished focus of the programmes characteristic for the country:
managerial

Tags: Education

What is Audience Development - AD?

According to the European Commission Audience Development is a strategic, dynamic and interactive process of making the arts widely accessible. It aims at engaging individuals and communities in experiencing, enjoying, participating in and valuing the arts through various means available today for cultural operators.

AD could be represented as a multi-faceted means aimed at deepening, strengthening and widening the relationship between cultural institutions and different audiences.

But how do students of cultural management understand AD? At the same time, to what extend are cultural practitioners aware of the importance of AD for their professional activities – and their cultural organisations at a broader level? And above all, would both students and practitioners be interested in taking a course in Audience Development?

These are the questions addressed by two different surveys carried out within the frame work of CONNECT, namely within the Working Program devoted to research activities. And here are the main findings of the surveys.

Students and AD

The research activities involved the participation of over 45 students enrolled in MA courses in management of the cultural sector over 5 different countries (Denmark, Italy, Poland, Spain and the United Kingdom). According to the vast majority of interviewed students, AD should indeed be taught in universities even if not as subject per se. Conversely, it should be addressed as an innovative way to approach cultural practice, and therefore the teaching of AD should delve less into technicalities and focus more on providing students with new tools for interpreting and understanding people, their thoughts and practices.

MA students would warmly welcome a course in AD. The course should indeed be thought-provoking in addressing the main features of AD, while it should mostly carry a practical connotation. Students would be interested in having the chance to conduct fieldwork, to visit cultural institutions but most importantly to work on AD-related project works granting students the possibility to think for themselves. With the ultimate goal of picking up from the course what makes potential audiences tick, how to better understand and reach them as well as how to communicate successfully with them.

Cultural practitioners and AD

Parallel to the survey on students ran an online questionnaire that reached out to over 620 cultural practitioners over the 5 different European countries. Cultural practitioners shared with students a strong interest in Audience Development. Yet, while students appeared to be more flexible in their approach to AD and therefore more eager to learn, practitioners working in the field reasonably shared a more structured understanding of AD. According to the data gathered, only about half of the cultural practitioners understand Audience Development as a subject not limited to marketing. And among those practitioners potentially interested in taking a course in AD, only half seems to possess the key management and marketing tools necessary for an effective delivery of AD-related activities.

Cultural practitioners too would warmly welcome a course in AD. Together with students, they would favour a practice-based approach. The importance of formal accreditation of such AD course starkly varies from country to country, while the vast majority of practitioners favours innovative teaching methodologies based on active learning over traditional lecture-style teaching.  

AD and higher education

The main findings of the surveys on students and cultural practitioners are not surprising if confronted with the actual educational offer within both graduate and post-graduate courses in the 5 countries covered by the research.

In fact, a third stream of research activity within CONNECT consisted in a survey of existing programmes of current practices on entrepreneurship education and audience development (an entrepreneurial approach is strictly linked to audience development practices). The main findings of the survey show that, with few exceptions with a good degree of coherence across all the 5 countries countries, both Audience Development and entrepreneurial skills are not yet commonly found within course curriculums and are mainly provided by vocational training providers (e.g. agencies, foundations, associations, etc.), rarely by universities.

Conclusion

Drawing from the survey on higher education courses, as well as from the surveys on students of cultural management and cultural practitioners across the 5 countries, AD is still an open issue in the European higher education sector. Few university courses target AD specifically; students are enthusiastic about discovering AD even if they struggle to conceive it as a subject “per se”; cultural practitioners agree on the strategic importance of AD but still tend to regard it as “mainly about marketing”.

What emerged from the research seems to acknowledge the importance of designing ad-hoc courses specifically dedicated to AD. Do not fear though – CONNECT Twin Track training programme is coming in Autumn 2018. Stay tuned for updates!